Tag Archives: resin

Fruity bangles

I have been so busy of late that I haven’t blogged, and I’ve not felt inspiration to do it either, sorry! However a couple of weeks ago I did show you a WIP of a custom apples and oranges bangle I was making, with matching earrings. It took a lot of clay slices and effort, but I think it was worth it! I would be happy to custom make these again, but they are too fiddly to list in my shop on a permanent basis!

On another note, I went to the Festival of Quilts and spent too much money on fabrics. I cut a strip from one of them and embedded in my first tall bangle! It needs a bit of sanding but I think it will look great!

Resin Meets Decopatch Pendant Tutorial

It’s about time I posted the other tutorial I promised a couple of weeks back; today I will be showing you how to make this…

YOU WILL NEED
1 Square Copper Patera Pendant (available here)
A sheet of Decopatch Paper- I used #358 (bought from The Decopatch Place)
Decopatch Glue and a brush
Silver colour letter beads (I bought mine from Dizzy Beads)
A Sixpence or other “lucky” coin
Resin Obsession Water Clear Resin (available here)
Mixing Cup
Stirring Stick
Disposable spoon (optional)

1) Tear the paper into tiny bits. Apply glue to the inside of a bezel and place a shred of paper in, coating it with more glue.

2) Keep adding pieces of paper and applying glue over the top. Use the straighter pieces to meet up with the edges of the bezel until it is all completely covered.
3) Whilst the glue is still wet, position your coin inside. Then insert the silver letter beads how you want them. Leave to dry.


4) Once completely dry, mix up some resin according to the instructions. I measure it in teaspoons, so two spoons A to one spoon of B. Fill the bezel until it domes and leave to set- that’s it!

I did have more photos but they were lost in the great memory card disaster so I hope this is OK!

Work in Progress

I’m working on a custom order for an orange and apple bangle and earrings at the minute- it takes lots of resin layers and lots of clay slices and I’m itching to see the end result!

Seaglass tutorial live and some other things…

As promised, I am letting you know that the faux seaglass tutorial I mentioned in my last post is now live on the Resin Obsession blog here!

Also I have been working on some custom pendants, including these hair ones, despite moving house in two days which is a total stress right now:

And I have just received delivery of some stuff that should make polyester resin less brittle (I’m thinking great for knitting needles) and some stuff you add to stop the nasty squidginess it sometimes has- I wish I had this before embarking on the chess set. Which reminds me I really should go back and look at that.

Faux seaglass

Using the new Resin Obsession resin, I have developed a technique for making fake seaglass. I have sent a tutorial off to Cindy over at RO for her blog, so you should see it there shortly.

I thought I’d share the results with you anyway- I’m going to take out the wire bits and jump ring them instead (I am truly crap at wire related stuff) and maybe add some nautical charms or shells to it to make more of a charm necklace.

W00t! A tute! Distressed Victorian Lace recycled jewellery pendant

It’s about time I shared a tutorial with you. I have a couple of other ones I hope to post relatively soon too…

You will need:
Clear Polyester Gelcoat
Plastic spoon (optional)
Plastic cup
Mixing stick
Mould release spray
Hot pink Pearl Ex powder
Lisa Pavelka “Romance” Texture stamp
Band Saw or Junior Hacksaw
Black pigment inkpad
Drill
Acrylic spray
9mm jump ring
Recycled jewellery chain
Recycled flower dangly earring

Suppliers:
Pearl Ex powder and Lisa Pavelka stamp from the Polymer Clay Pit: www.polymerclaypit.co.uk


1) Prep the texture stamp with mould release spray and leave to dry. Spoon about 4 level teaspoons of polyester gelcoat into a plastic cup and add catalyst as directed.



2) Stir well until it is a beige colour instead of pink and sprinkle in some pink pearl ex powder. Use the stick to mix this in thoroughly to give a pearlised effect.



3) Pour the gelcoat onto the rubber stamp and then level out with the spoon. Leave to set for about an hour- gelcoat sets much faster than normal resin!


4) Pull the rubber carefully away from the resin piece.


5) Cut a rectangle out of the resin sheet. I used a band saw, but you can also use a junior hacksaw if you don’t have one.



6) Apply the ink to the texture on the resin thoroughly and leave to dry for a few minutes before sealing with an acrylic spray.



7) Drill a hole through the top of the piece. Take some old chain from some retro costume jewellery and attach each end to the pendant through a 9mm jump ring. The chain should be long enough that it doesn’t need a clasp. Next, take the earwire off an old costume earring and hand the charm in front of the resin piece. Close the jump ring.

Enjoy!

Patera bezels

I’ve just started selling the Patera range of deep well bezels in my shop. They’re not cheap as they’re made in the US from cast pewter and then coated (the £50 postage and customs bill didn’t help either!). I have a small selection of shapes in antique gold, antique silver, sterling silver and copper. Here’s one I made earlier…

PRESS RELEASE: New Bezels for Resin Exclusively at PennyDog

A range of acrylic bezels- specifically for resin jewellery- now available

PennyDog continues to pioneer contemporary resin crafting in the UK with the introduction of specially designed acrylic jewellery bezels. The initial range features heart and star pendants and square bracelet feature blanks, all with a generous 5mm depth for embedding all sorts of goodies. Uniquely, they also come with a template for cutting fabric and paper to fit inside, making the process so simple and ideal for beginners.

Currently available in black, there are plans for white bezel bangles and circle pendants for late summer. The bezels are laser cut from sturdy acrylic in two sections, then pieced together by hand. Priced at just £2.20 for a pendant, they make creating professional results affordable.

All customers that purchase a bezel can enter their finished creations into a pool on Flickr (http://www.flickr.com/groups/pennydogbezelcomp/) to be in with a chance of winning a bracelet bezel set and two further bezels of their choice! The closing date is November 1st 2010, so why not get making this summer?

Bezels and other resin supplies, as well as finished jewellery pieces are available at www.penny-dog.co.uk .

A few good (wo)men

After my last negative(ish) post about resin crafters that copy, I’ve decided to show some of my favourite designers here who are making marvellous work in the world of resin! I even own a pendant from Serena Kuhl, a ring from Fake ID from the Resin Swap and I’m excitedly waiting for a cuff from Buy My Crap– proving there’s no reason why you shouldn’t buy something you like even if it is in a medium you  are very confident in yourself- in fact it makes you appreciate the skill even more!

 

 

 

Hearts are really big at the minute it seems! Please click on the items to go to the sellers’ shops.

Mimickry is a form of flattery…

… is what my OH has just told me. I’ve discovered yet more people selling resin fruit jewellery which I originally started making about 2 years ago now, and for less than I sell it for. Thing is it’s an easy thing to do, buy polymer clay canes and stick pieces in resin, so I don’t know if I can state ownership of the design, but it’s still very annoying.

I suppose this means I am always one step ahead?

A few months ago I had similar concerns over a magazine article that was very similar to the way I’d written one in my book with a few additions which were actually pretty good. I sent the relevant pages of my book to the editor of the magazine and asked for her opinion on the matter. It then got dealt with in the wrong way and turned out that the author of the article who used to be a regular customer of mine got upset by the accusation, of which it wasn’t- it was a concern to be addressed by the editor only- and as a result of the editor passing the buck, this lady no longer references me as her supplier for moulds in her articles anymore. Very annoyed and I would truly love to name this magazine now but I won’t!

I guess there’s nothing more to do than keep exploring the limits of the medium and try to stay ahead of the game through being an experimenter and taking onboard the wants of the wider public, sharing the ones in books and articles that I don’t mind giving away and keeping the others to myself. I do like people learning to make resin jewellery themselves, this is why I wrote my book in the first place and chose to import the moulds from the States so that we have better supplies in this country for practising the craft. I just think there’s a difference between an artist explorign different designs, techniques and then making them reflect their own personality and style, and a crafter copying existing designs either directly from tutorials or from other people’s work.

I’m thinking about seasonalising my jewellery, rather than having it available constantly for years in the same designs, not only to reflect fashion trends but to make it more exclusive. What are the important factors for you when buying jewellery? Style? Price? Something unusual you’ve not seen before? Materials? Craftsmanship? Please share your thoughts and hopefully there will be a nice assortment of ideas from you that I can learn from and build upon for the next collection!